Caring for a loved one or client can be rewarding. However, there are times when providing care can be awkward. It can be particularly challenging to care for a client or loved one who refuses to accept help. In fact, although the relationship between you and your loved one or client is important, it may also be complicated. As a caregiver, you must develop a good rapport with your loved one or client to make sure he or she is comfortable while you are providing care. The following are seven ways you can make your loved one or client comfortable and create a great bond:

Be compassionate

Compassion is one of the core traits you must possess to be an effective caregiver. It should be noted, that the complexity of the care that you provide can test your patience. In fact, your loved one or client may have medical conditions may that he or she finds frustrating. These frustrations might spill over into the interactions between you and your loved one or client while you are providing care. Over time the relationship can become strained and ultimately disrupt his or her quality of life. Demonstrating compassion, will disarm him or her and over time and help you with building a trusting relationship.

Have Patience

Patience is one trait that can help your loved one or client feel more comfortable. It will be difficult to successfully carry out your duties if you are not patient. Caring for a loved one or clients, who are recovering from a traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer’s disease, or a loss of speech will need special care.

Be respectful

You must respect your loved one, client, and their family. If you are providing care in their home, be sure to be courteous in your dealings. When a client or loved one feels respected, he or she is more likely to be open with you. A respectful relationship also helps to build trust that will be essential for longevity.

Maintain Good Communication

The best way to initiate and maintain good communication is by encouraging your loved one or client to ask for help. For example, if your loved one or client is having a hard time sleeping comfortably, you might encourage purchasing a hospital bed for rent so that he or she can get a better night’s sleep. Solid communication between you and your loved one or client will invariably demonstrate your commitment.

Be a Good Listener

Your loved one or client may be frustrated from time to time. It is important that you are a good listener. You may be the only one whom your loved one or client can share their feelings openly. Paying attention and listening to them is one sure way of building a bond.

During conversations, be sure to pay attention to verbal, non-verbal cues, and posturing. Make eye contact, do not interrupt unnecessarily, and be sure to ask questions. After conversations, be sure that your loved one or client feels understood.

Provide Encouragement  

Your loved one or client may feel like a burden. It may be the only reason why your loved one or client does not improve, even when their physical condition may suggest otherwise. Encourage them by highlighting the meaning and purpose that life still holds. Find ways to empower your loved one by encouraging him or her to do what he or she can for as long as possible. This will greatly increase your loved one or client’s self-esteem.

Though caregiving can be challenging, it is possible to foster a caring and safe relationship between you and your loved one or client.